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Beverley Minster Choir Screen - Beverley

Scott first designed a choir screen with Moffatt in 1842, but it was not until 1875 that the eighteenth century stone screen was removed to allow construction of the new one, by James Elwell of Beverley.


Beverley Minster - Beverley

Scott carried out general restoration work at this church from 1866 until his death in 1878. This included repairing the nave roof in 1868, decorating the roofs and the ceiling of the eastern parts and the crossing. The choir ceiling was decorated with large painted roundels and a new pavement laid. He also provided a new organ screen and altar rail which were being made when he died.


St Mary's refitting - Beverley

From 1864-7, Scott refitted the nave at this church including providing a new alabaster pulpit.


St Mary's - Beverley

In 1875-6, Scott returned to restore the nave and refit the choir and sanctuary, with a new screen in the sanctuary, a drawing of it dating to 1875.


Priory Church, St Mary's - Bridlington

Between 1855 and 1858 Scott reseated the church, restored the nave and renewed part of the roof.

Fisher, G., Stamp, G. and Heseltine, J., (eds), The Scott Family, Catalogue of the Drawings Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects (Avebury Publishing, Amersham, 1981), 23 [a].
Pevsner, N. and Neave, D., Yorkshire: York and East Riding in the Buildings of England (Penguin Books, London, 1995), p. 344.



Priory Church, St Mary's, repairs - Bridlington

Further repairs to the church were carried out by Scott in 1871.

Fisher, G., Stamp, G. and Heseltine, J., (eds), The Scott Family, Catalogue of the Drawings Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects (Avebury Publishing, Amersham, 1981), 23 [a].



Priory Church, St Mary's, second restoration - Bridlington

In 1875, Scott embarked on a second extensive restoration, which was finished eight years after his death by John Oldrid. The main part of this was to emphasise the difference between the two western towers; the older tower, on the north side was given straight parapet, while on the south side an eighteenth century turret was removed and replaced with an ornate Perpendicular composition to match the style of the lower parts of the tower. In 1875, Scott designed a high altar reredos for Mr Wills which was executed by Farmer and Brindley.

Fisher, G., Stamp, G. and Heseltine, J., (eds), The Scott Family, Catalogue of the Drawings Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects (Avebury Publishing, Amersham, 1981), 23 [a].



Christ Church - Bridlington

In 1840, Scott and Moffatt’s practice obtained six new churches in quick succession. The first of these was probably Christ Church, Bridlington, possibly through the influence of his cousin at Hull, some twenty-five miles to the south and where Scott had been on his Yorkshire tour nine years previously. It was built between 1840-2 and followed the usual basic design of Commissioners' churches. It provided 600 sittings and although it cost £2,500, the Commissioners contributed a mere £100. It is a basic hall-church, with minor transepts as at Lincoln, and a western tower in a plain lancet style.

They may have designed at the same time, the vicarage, which is a tall red brick house, with slate roofs and over-hanging eaves.

Port, M. H., Six Hundred New Churches, A Study of the Church Building Commission, 1818-1856 and its Church Building Activities ( S.P.C.K., London, 1961), p. 165.
http://www.churchplansonline.org/show_full_image.asp?resource_id=02387.tif



All Saints - Great Driffield

At some point Scott must have carried out an inspection here, of the fabric of the building, as it was detailed in a newspaper report of 1880. The actual restoration was carried out by George Gilbert junior, in 1879-80, after the elder Scott's death.

http://www.reynolds-lake.ca/genealogy/showmedia.php?mediaID=3224&medialinkID=5380
Driffield Times and General Advertiser, 6 November 1880.



St Nicholas's - Hornsea

Between 1865-8, Scott restored this church, with general repairs to the roof and walls, and a reseating. The top storey of the tower was rebuilt and the pinnacles were added.

http://www.churchplansonline.org/show_full_image.asp?resource_id=06436.tif



Holy Trinity - Kingston-upon-Hull

Scott carried out restoration work here, reporting on the building in 1859, and then completing the work until 1873. It was carried out for the vicar, Rev. McCormick, and accounts paid by Colonel Peace at the Old Bank, Hull. His drawings show plans for refitting and restoration which included new rooms on the south side of the chancel replacing chapels, completed in 1873, restoring the Broadly Chapel and the nave, transepts and chancel, rearranging it so it so that it could be used 'like a cathedral'. Scott refused to replace the brickwork by stone. He also drew up designs for Parclose Screens in 1876-7 and Reredos in 1884, although this was not begun until 1884. In November 1874, he drew up a plan for a wall and railings for the boundary wall for the Hull Corporation Burial Board with an estimated price of £1617 – the scheme seems to have been abandoned.


Holy Trinity Parclose Screens - Kingston-upon-Hull

Scott drew up designs for Parclose Screens in 1876-7 and the reredos for this church, although they were not begun until 1884, after his death.


Hull Corporation Burial Board - Kingston-upon-Hull

In November 1874, Scott drew up a plan for a wall and railings for the boundary wall of Holy Trinity Church for the Hull Corporation Burial Board, with an estimated price of £1617 – the scheme seems to have been abandoned.


St Mary's - Kingston-upon-Hull

Scott had been particularly friendly with the Hull Scotts' during his early years in practice. It was in 1816 that his uncle, John Scott (1777-1834), became the Vicar of St. Mary's, Hull and Lecturer of Holy Trinity, Hull and established a dynasty of John Scotts' as the Vicars of St. Mary's. His son became Vicar in 1834 and his son, in turn, became Vicar in 1865 after his father's death. Between 1861 and 1863 Scott restored his cousin's church, casing the exterior in ashlar, adding a new south aisle and porch in the Perpendicular style to match the existing building, and opening the base of the tower to insert a pedestrian walkway. He also provided pews, a pulpit and stone reredos in Gothic style. The cost of the work, £8,000, was borne by John, who is commemorated in the church by the east window and with an incised stone slab against the east wall designed in 1865.

Pevsner, N. and Neave, D., Yorkshire, York and East Riding, Buildings of England (Penguin Books, London, 1995), p. 511.



St Mary's Vicarage - Kingston-upon-Hull

Scott built a four-storied red brick vicarage for his cousin, John Scott, at the rear of the church, now St Mary’s Court, the date on the stone, 1864. This is an asymmetrical design, in Scott's personal style, including pointed arches with alternating voussoirs, blue brick bands and a large stone oriel window.

Pevsner, N. and Neave, D., Yorkshire, York and East Riding, Buildings of England (Penguin Books, London, 1995), pp. 512, 535.



Monument to John Scott - Kingston-upon-Hull

In 1865, Scott designed with an incised stone slab against the east wall of St Mary's Church to commemorate his cousin, John Scott, who had been vicar of the church. The slab again must have been Scott's personal design but perhaps because it is inside the church, is very different to the austere churchyard memorials that he provided for the other members of his family. The design is picked out in black cement and depicts his cousin in clerical robes surrounded by an inscription. This technique is similar to the one which he was to use for the biblical scenes he personally designed for the paving of Gloucester Cathedral choir.

Pevsner, N. and Neave, D., Yorkshire, York and East Riding, Buildings of England (Penguin Books, London, 1995), p. 511.
Welander, D., The History, Art and Architecture of Gloucester Cathedral (Sutton Publishing, Stroud, 1991), p. 474.



St John the Evangelist's - Sewerby

This church was designed by Scott and Moffatt and built between 1847-8, paid for by Yarburgh Greame, then the High Sheriff of Yorkshire. It is in neo-Norman style with a chancel, nave, north transept, south porch, south-east turret and short broach spire. Scott noted in his Recollections, that ‘difficulties arose from the fads of my employer’.

http://www.stjohnsewerby.org.uk/Guide%20Book-1.pdf



Sewerby School - Sewerby

Yarburgh Greame, then the High Sheriff of Yorkshire, also provided a new school for the village which Scott and Moffatt completed between 1849-50, of yellow brick in Gothic style. It is now Leys House.


St Helen's - Welton

Scott ‘almost rebuilt’ this church, according to Betjeman, when he restored it in 1862-3, reconstructing it in Middle Pointed style, reusing the fabric of the older church. He built a new west end of the nave, south aisle, transepts and a new form of tower with new bell openings.


St Germain's Church, brass lectern - Winstead

Scott designed a brass lectern for this church, with an eagle, which was not made by Cox & Co. until 1890.