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Pippbrook House and Museum - Dorking

While Brownsover Hall was still in its early stages, Scott was very fortunate to receive a somewhat smaller commission, where he was allowed to put into practice, ‘a great deal of what I was working out’ at the time. This was a house that he built for William Henry Forman (1794-1869), a millionaire ironmaster, at Dorking in Surrey. Forman bought the eighteenth century Pippbrook House, which stood on a sloping site on the southern edge of Dorking overlooking the Surrey Hills, and in 1855 commissioned Scott to turn it into a Gothic mansion. Scott made a modest little house into something more appropriate to the wealth and dignity of its owner. His main addition to the old house is two storeys high, with a basement and a high-pitched roof with dormers behind a parapet. It is an asymmetrical design with bay windows to make the most of the views to the south-west. The style is Middle Pointed with square-heads to most of the windows and the work was carried out by Francis Ruddle between 1856-7.

Almost before the work was completed, Forman decided to add a museum to the rear of the house, where the ground falls away to the south, to house his collection of antiquities. This is a large single-storied room, on a basement which emerges out of the sloping ground, and is of a much more advanced design than the rest of the house with a range of pointed traceried windows at the main level, the design exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1858. The house cost Forman the then enormous sum of £20,000, and was the public library of Dorking until it closed in 2012. It displays the sort of opulence, particularly in its interiors, which Scott would have thought befitted his client. However, the special interest of Scott's work at Pippbrook is that it shows, with the extension, the exact time when he gained enough confidence to actually build a domestic building in a High Victorian Gothic style that he had been thinking about since the Hamburg Rathaus design, and was able to explain in a second book which he writing at the time. This was his Remarks on Secular & Domestic Architecture, Present & Future, which John Murray published in 1857, with a second, slightly amended, edition in the following year.

Scott’s Recollections, II 272.
Fisher, G., Stamp, G. and Heseltine, J., (eds), The Scott Family, Catalogue of the Drawings Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects (Avebury Publishing, Amersham, 1981), 28 [b & c].
Crook, J. M., The Rise of the Nouveaux Riches, Style and Status in Victorian and Edwardian Architecture (John Murray, London, 1999), p. 288, n. 22.
Eastlake, C. L., A History of the Gothic Revival (Longmans, Green and Co., London 1872), p. [95].



Horton Manor House - Epsom

This house was built by Scott in around 1872 for H. Trotter Esq., at a cost of £12,000. The fee paid to Scott’s office in 1872 was £635-16-6d. The London County Council bought the estate in the 1890s and the buildings were used as an overflow for London Lunatic Asylums and a colony for epileptics.

http://derelictmisc.org.uk/cluster.html



St John the Evangelist's - Farncombe

Built by Scott between 1844 and 1849 when it was consecrated, this is a lancet style church.

http://www.churchplansonline.org/show_full_image.asp?resource_id=03388.tif



St John the Evangelist's enlargement - Farncombe

A north aisle was added to this church, by Scott, in 1860.

http://www.churchplansonline.org/show_full_image.asp?resource_id=05559.tif



St John the Evangelist's additions - Farncombe

A further south aisle and south chancel aisle was added by Scott to this church in 1873-5, the accounts paid in 1876 totalling £103.

http://www.churchplansonline.org/show_full_image.asp?resource_id=07557.tif



St Peter and St Paul's - Godalming

This was a church restoration carried out jointly by Scott and R. Neville between 1877-9 for the Honourable and Rev. Allan Broderick. The pre-Norman Conquest west tower arch was removed and replaced by an imitation thirteenth century one, and the tower was strengthened, destroying much Saxon work. Alterations had been carried out in 1840 but these were also removed.


St Nicholas's - Godstone

Although Scott's stay at Rooks Nest was to be only three years, as well as Caroline’s grave, Scott was able to leave other memorials of their brief stay in the neighbourhood. A year after the family moved into the house, Scott became involved in the restoration and enlargement of Godstone Church for George Macleay (1809-1891) between October 1870 and December 1871. Macleay had recently retired as Speaker of the Legislative Council of New South Wales and settled at Pendell Court, a fine Jacobean mansion three miles from Godstone, where his ancestors are buried. Scott's work included a new south aisle, opening the nave roof, refitting the interior, raising the tower to include a new belfry stage and heightening the spire. He created the Macleay Chapel under the tower with vaulting and wall paintings. The builder was William Carruthers of Reigate.

Cole, D., The Work of Sir Gilbert Scott (The Architectural Press, London, 1980), p. 132.
Fisher, G., Stamp, G. and Heseltine, J., (eds), The Scott Family, Catalogue of the Drawings Collection of the Royal Institute of British Architects (Avebury Publishing, Amersham, 1981), 33 [a], 65 [a].
Clunn, H., The Face of the Home Counties etc. (Simpkin Marshall, London, 1936), p. 329.
Pevsner, N., and Nairn, I., Surrey, Buildings of England (Penguin Books, Harmondsworth, 1971), p. 405.



Pendell Court Billiard Room - Blechingley

Scott restored and extended Pendell Court in 1877-8 for George Macleay (1809-1891). Macleay had recently retired as Speaker of the Legislative Council of New South Wales and settled at Pendell Court, a fine Jacobean mansion three miles from Godstone, where his ancestors are buried. In 1877, he added a billiard room to Pendell Court in a style to match the old house. The contract was worth £2000, with Scott’s fees at £142.


St Mary's Homes - Godstone

In 1872, Scott completed an amazingly picturesque group of eight almshouses and a chapel immediately to the south of Godstone Church. These were built for Mrs Augusta Nona Hunt of Godstone as a memorial to her daughter, Mabel Fanny, who had died aged fourteen. It is a delightfully informal composition of little houses stepping up to the chapel, which is crowned with a fleche, and then carried on along the top of a bank. All are in a Tudor timber-framed style with decorated plaster panels, with the exception of the chancel of the chapel, which is Norman in style and built of stone with mosaic interior floors. The whole design has a romantic, almost playful, character and is certainly not a typical product of Spring Gardens, but a fitting memorial to a much loved child. Again it seems that Scott, when left to himself, could produce something very different to the ‘consistent style’ that Jackson refers to as emanating from the office.

Pevsner, N., and Nairn, I., Surrey, Buildings of England (Penguin Books, Harmondsworth, 1971), p. 260.
Stamp, G., An Architect of Promise, George Gilbert Scott Junior (1839-1897) and the Late Gothic Revival (Shaun Tyas, Donnington, 2002), p. 93.
Jackson, B. H., Recollections of Thomas Graham Jackson … 1835-1924 (Oxford University Press, London, 1950), p. 59.



Workhouse - Guildford

This workhouse was built to a Scott and Moffatt plan between 1837-8, in a classical style, with a single storey front block, an arched centre and two storey end blocks. The design was approved in 1836, the authorised expenditure was £5,075 for the construction of the building and it was to accommodate up to 300 inmates. It has now been demolished.


St John's, Knapp Hill - Woking

Scott completed a design for the church in 1877, charging £26 for the service, although it was not built.


Christchurch - Ottershaw

This church was designed and built by Scott, completed in 1864, in thirteenth century style, with an apse in polychrome brick with inlaid tiles. The patron was Sir Thomas Edward Colebrooke, who bore the entire cost of the build as well as an endowment. The original spire was replaced with a tower in 1885.


St Barnabas's - Ranmore

This church was designed and built by Scott, consecrated in 1859, for George Cubitt, son of Thomas the builder and a friend of Scott’s. It was intended for people employed on the family’s estate at Denbies. The builder was George Dines and with the exterior entirely faced in rounded flint cobbles and a prominent spire on an octagon, it was criticised by Betjeman as having no regard for the local style and for being a rich man’s church. The interior is similarly grand with a red Cornish serpentine font on a granite plinth.


St Barnabas's Vicarage and School - Ranmore

Along with the church, Scott completed an asymmetrical three storey vicarage with a stone porch and a similar school, with fees for the church and school rendered in 1874 of £50.


St Mary Magdalene - Reigate

Scott carried out a restoration at this church in 1874-8, refacing the tower in stone and rebuilding the interior to follow the original. This included building a new organ chamber and vestries.

http://www.churchplansonline.org/retrieve_results.asp?search_args=x%3DREIGATE%2C+St.+Mary+Magdalene%7Cl%3DREIGATE%7Cc%3DSurrey



St Mary's - Shackleford

Scott designed and built this church, in Early English style, between 1865-7 out of the local Bargate sandstone. It has a central tower, transepts and apse at the east end, with a timber broach spire and circular clerestory and his design was admired by Pevsner.


St Mary's Church Prayer Desk and Lectern - Shackleford

Scott designed a prayer desk and lectern for the church for the Rev. A. Buttemer, with the £14 fees paid in 1877.


Monument to Caroline Scott, St Peter's - Tandridge

On 24 February 1872 Scott's wife, Caroline, died, ‘snatched away from us during sleep!!!’ Caroline was buried on 29 February 1872 in the churchyard of the parish church, St. Peter's, about one mile from Rooks Nest but visible from the house. Seven members of the office attended the funeral: Charles Baker King, the two Bignalls, Arthur Baker, Medland, Micklethwaite and Scott's private secretary, George Wood. Clayton, Bell, Philip and Brindley also attended. Scott wrote on 12 March that:

I have designed what I trust will be a beautiful monument to my ever dearest Carry. It is to be a low altar tomb partly of polished white marble and in part of Polished Granite. The upper stone which is of marble will have a richly floriated cross the foliage being partly conventional & partly natural the latter carrying out her intense love of flowers and of botany.

Around the sides of the tomb are seven medallions containing figures symbolizing Caroline's special virtues: faith, hope, charity, counsel, mercy, purity of heart and the fear of God. At the foot of the tomb is a heraldic lozenge containing the three Catherine Wheels of the Scott's of Kent. The whole of the white marble tomb chest is covered with intricate carving and stands on a polished granite base. It is completely different to the plain and rather dignified ledger stones that Scott designed for other members of his family. In these special circumstances Scott forsook Gothic for a design that has an early Italian Renaissance appearance. He was clearly trying to reflect Caroline's character and there is nothing to suggest that she ever had any interest in the Gothic style. As he had shown before, Scott could produce an excellent design without recourse to his favourite style. The proliferation of delicate foliage gives it an unmistakably feminine character yet with a sound geometric basis.

Scott's Recollections, III 62, 143-5, 150.
Scott's Sketchbook, I, book plate (RIBA).
Cole, D., The Work of Sir Gilbert Scott (The Architectural Press, London, 1980), p. 156.
Royal Commission for Historic Monuments (South), letter to Irvine, 25 February 1872.



St Peter's - Tandridge

Scott returned to Tandridge in 1874 to enlarge the church by adding a north aisle and a new vestry and restoring the south aisle, for the Rev. A. H. Borrodaile. Again the gentleness of his touch is not what one usually associates with Scott but perhaps he wanted to keep the old church as close as possible to way that Caroline, his wife, would have remembered it. He had designed a monument to ‘Mrs Scott’, a richly sculpted marble tomb chest, in 1872 and also designed the reredos, the gift of Mrs Bonsor.

Cole, D., The Work of Sir Gilbert Scott (The Architectural Press, London, 1980), p. 165.



Holy Trinity - Westcott

This church was designed and built by Scott in 1851-2 on a cruciform plan, with a low timber spire with shingled roof. A grant of £75 was given by the ICBS for 262 additional seats for the poor.


Holy Trinity enlargement - Westcott

In 1855-6, Scott enlarged the church with a new south aisle and transept.

http://www.churchplansonline.org/show_full_image.asp?resource_id=04888.tif



St John the Baptist's - Woking

Built in 1841-2 with Moffatt, St. John's church was in the lancet style. It was a very cheap aisleless chapel, costing only £1,450, and looks it, with yellow brick dressings to the stonework and a small spire over the chancel arch. The money was raised by the Rev. Charles Bowles. Scott was later able to hide some of the crudity of the design by the addition of gabled aisles. The mosaic flooring at the end of the chancel was made by women inmates of the former Woking prison.

Cole, D., The Work of Sir Gilbert Scott (The Architectural Press, London, 1980), p. 25.
http://www.churchplansonline.org/show_full_image.asp?resource_id=02920.tif
http://www.stjohnswoking.org.uk/content/church-history



St Michael's - York Town, Ash

In 1858-9, Scott carried out work here to enlarge the church built ten years earlier, including a new chancel.

http://www.churchplansonline.org/show_full_image.asp?resource_id=05335.tif



St John's, Knapp Hill - Woking

Scott completed a design for the church in 1877, charging £26 for the service, although it was not built.